Why Your Brainstorm Was Mired In Fog

Brainstorming sessions sound like a great idea. People imagine that they’ll get the best minds together, everyone will throw out great ideas, magic will be created, and they’ll arrive at newest, best-est idea ever as a team.

The fact is that this is almost never what happens. Instead, there is a lot of awkward staring in a silent room. Maybe the expected person will contribute some nonstarters,  someone else will ball-hog the air in the room, and another will play defense in support of their idea. The result is more of a wet blanket of fog rather than a downpour and flood of ideas. That’s not what anyone signed up for. And it’s not productive.

Improv Fuels Better Brainstorming Output

The principles of improv are ideal for brainstorming because they enable creation in the moment to further the ideas presented.  What many people fail to realize is that while the improv they’ve seen on stage might be created in the moment, there is a structure and principles that guide the creation. And practice. Lots of practice. Because the artists embrace the principles, they can run with it and make it look easy. Here are four thoughts from improv to be aware of before your next brainstorming session. They create a foundation for inclusion, awareness, and moving creative ideas forward.

This is our idea – Realize from the beginning that this is going to be our project, not your project. It’s “we,” not “I.” There’s a saying at the Second City, “bring a brick, not a cathedral.” That encourages participants that they need to bring an idea or thought, not a fully formed production. Allow space for the group to add their expertise and perspective to reach the best final product, or they’ll stop contributing.

Let go of the wheel – If you try to steer this thing you’ll wreck it. Improv and brainstorming sessions should have a natural flow. It will and should bump up against the edges of what’s acceptable and realistic. If it doesn’t, you and the team aren’t there yet. Trying to wrestle control will keep you from pushing ideas to where true inspiration and insight flourish. That’s not to say they can’t benefit from guidance, but trust the process. Give this horse his head to run.

Make it a safe place – Some of the ideas and paths are going to fail, but everyone has to overcome any fear associated with that fear.  You need the off-base crazy ideas as well—they just might be the catalyst that takes the idea a leap further and sets it apart. And they need to be presented and heard without judgment. Starting with the mindset, “what if this was a good idea—where would it go next?” and Yes, And-ing what comes next allows the team to explore it together without judgment.

Set the stage for success – Not considering the group dynamics and structure is one of the biggest barriers to success. No professional troop would throw a newbie onto the stage of the main act cold. It’s the same with your business team. When you’re teaching new skills, you break the process into smaller and manageable steps. For brainstorming that might require time in smaller groups and attention to the balance and make-up of the groups. Pushing associates out of their comfort zone is is key to getting the best ideas, but push too hard too soon and they’ll shut down and not contribute.

Improv A Better Brainstorm

The result of an improv-based brainstorm is that more people are included, invested in the project, and contributing. Employers get the full benefit of the creative minds they hired. Associates get to do what they enjoy most. And the number and quality of ideas will surpass by many factors of those created in meetings stuck in a brain fog without improv.

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